ISO 56002:2019 Innovation management — Innovation management system — Guidance

The organization’s ability to innovate is recognized as a key factor for sustainable growth, economic life, increasing welfare and community development. An organization’s innovation capabilities include understanding and responding to changes in the context of the organization, pursuing new opportunities, making the most of the knowledge and creativity of people within the organization, and collaborating with external stakeholders. An organization can innovate more effectively and efficiently if all the necessary activities and other factors that are related and interact with each other are considered and managed as a system.

The innovation management system guides and guides the organization to determine the vision, strategy, policy, innovative goals and processes and support needed to achieve the expected results.

The potential benefits of implementing an innovation management system based on the ISO 56002 document (ISO 56002 standard) include the following:

A) increase the ability to manage uncertainty;

B) Improving stability and flexibility;

C) increase growth rate, revenues, profitability and competitiveness;

D) reduce costs and waste and increase productivity and resource efficiency;

E) Increasing the satisfaction of the organization’s employees, users, customers and other stakeholders;

F) Sustainable portfolio renewal (including stocks, products, services, ideas and whatever the organization offers);

G) Hiring and utilizing innovative and capable people in the organization;

H) increase the ability to attract partners, partners and capital;

I) increase the credibility and value of the organization;

J) Facilitate compliance with relevant regulations and requirements.

Fundamentals of Innovation Management

ISO 56002 is based on the principles of innovation management. The basics or principles of innovation management include its statement, an argument for why it is important to the organization, examples of related benefits, and finally examples of actions that the organization can take when performing the document for better performance.

The following principles are the foundation of the innovation management system:

A) value creation;

B) Prospective leaders;

C) strategic orientation;

D) culture of innovation;

E) taking advantage of people’s insights;

F) uncertainty management;

G) adaptability;

H) Systemic approach.

Innovation management system

Innovation management system is a set of elements that interact with each other with the aim of creating value. This system provides a common framework for developing and deploying capabilities to innovate, evaluate, improve and achieve the desired results.

These elements can be used gradually in the organization to implement the system according to the context of the organization and the specific environment or context in which it operates. The organization can enjoy the full benefits of this system when all the elements of the innovation management system are properly implemented in the organization. It should be noted that the effective implementation of the innovation management system depends on the commitment of senior management and the ability of leaders to promote innovation capabilities and a culture of supporting innovative activities.

Organizations can create unified or separate structures to implement innovation activities. These structures may require different leadership styles, competencies, and cultures. Implementing an innovation management system can encourage the organization to challenge the status quo and create organizational assumptions and structures. This system can help the organization in managing uncertainty and risk.

Innovation measures can be implemented through processes that identify opportunities, create and validate concepts, and develop and deploy solutions. These innovation processes are repetitive and often run in a non-linear sequence. They must be flexible and adaptable to the types of organizational innovations that the organization seeks to achieve.

Management system standards complement each other, but can also be used independently. This document can be established along with other management system standards and help organizations to balance the use of existing offers and operations by discovering and introducing new offers (new services and products). Organizations can find a balance between the Innovation Management Guide and other management system standards.

Implementing an effective and efficient innovation management system can affect or influence other management systems, and it may also require integration at several levels. Organizations that have not adopted the standards of another management system can use this document as an independent guide within their organization.

ABSTRACT 

1.1 This document provides guidance for the establishment, implementation, maintenance, and continual improvement of an innovation management system for use in all established organizations. It is applicable to:

a) organizations seeking sustained success by developing and demonstrating their ability to effectively manage innovation activities to achieve the intended outcomes;

b) users, customers, and other interested parties, seeking confidence in the innovation capabilities of an organization;

c) organizations and interested parties seeking to improve communication through a common understanding of what constitutes an innovation management system;

d) providers of training in, assessment of, or consultancy for, innovation management and innovation management systems;

e) policy makers, aiming for higher effectiveness of support programs targeting the innovation capabilities and competitiveness of organizations and the development of society.

1.2 All the guidance within this document is generic and intended to be applicable to:

a) all types of organizations, regardless of type, sector, or size. The focus is on established organizations, with the understanding that both temporary organizations and start-ups can also benefit by applying these guidelines in all or in part;

b) all types of innovations, e.g. product, service, process, model, and method, ranging from incremental to radical;

c) all types of approaches, e.g. internal and open innovation, user-, market-, technology-, and design-driven innovation activities.

It does not describe detailed activities within the organization, but rather provides guidance at a general level. It does not prescribe any requirements or specific tools or methods for innovation activities.

GENERAL INFORMATION 

  • Status :  Published
    Publication date : 2019-07
  • Edition : 1
    Number of pages : 26

Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies (ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through ISO technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical committee has been established has the right to be represented on that committee. International organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work. ISO collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.
The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular the different approval criteria needed for the different types of ISO documents should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www.iso.org/directives).
Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of patent rights. ISO shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights. Details of any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the Introduction and/or on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www.iso.org/patents).
Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not constitute an endorsement.
For an explanation on the meaning of ISO specific terms and expressions related to conformity assessment, as well as information about ISO’s adherence to the World Trade Organization (WTO) principles in the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) see the following URL:
www.iso.org/iso/foreword.html.
The committee responsible for this document is ISO/TC 279, Innovation management.
Any feedback or questions on this document should be directed to the user’s national standards body. A complete listing of these bodies can be found at www.iso.org/members.html.
 
 
 

0   Introduction

0.1   General
An organization’s ability to innovate is recognized as a key factor for sustained growth, economic viability, increased well-being, and the development of society.
The innovation capabilities of an organization include the ability to understand and respond to changing conditions of its context, to pursue new opportunities, and to leverage the knowledge and creativity of people within the organization, and in collaboration with external interested parties.
An organization can innovate more effectively and efficiently if all necessary activities and other interrelated or interacting elements are managed as a system.
An innovation management system guides the organization to determine its innovation vision, strategy, policy, and objectives, and to establish the support and processes needed to achieve the intended outcomes.
The potential benefits of implementing an innovation management system in accordance with this document are:
  • a) increased ability to manage uncertainty;
  • b) increased growth, revenues, profitability, and competitiveness;
  • c) reduced costs and waste, and increased productivity and resource efficiency;
  • d) improved sustainability and resilience;
  • e) increased satisfaction of users, customers, citizens, and other interested parties;
  • f) sustained renewal of the portfolio of offerings;
  • g) engaged and empowered people in the organization;
  • h) increased ability to attract partners, collaborators, and funding;
  • i) enhanced reputation and valuation of the organization;
  • j) facilitated compliance with regulations and other relevant requirements.
0.2   Innovation management principles
This document is based on innovation management principles. An innovation management principle includes a statement of the principle, a rationale of why the principle is important for the organization, some examples of benefits associated with the principle, and finally examples of actions the organization can take to improve performance when applying the principle.
The following principles are the foundation of the innovation management system:
  • a) realization of value;
  • b) future-focused leaders;
  • c) strategic direction;
  • d) culture;
  • e) exploiting insights;
  • f) managing uncertainty;
  • g) adaptability;
  • h) systems approach.
The principles can be considered as an open set to be integrated and adapted within the organization.
0.3   Innovation management system
0.3.1   General
An innovation management system is a set of interrelated and interacting elements, aiming for the realization of value. It provides a common framework to develop and deploy innovation capabilities, evaluate performance, and achieve intended outcomes.
The elements can be gradually adopted to implement the system according to the particular context and circumstances of the organization. Full benefits can be gained when all the elements of the innovation management system, are adopted by the organization.
Ultimately, the effective implementation of the innovation management system relies on the commitment by top management and the ability of leaders to promote innovation capabilities and a culture supporting innovation activities.
0.3.2   Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle
The Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) cycle enables continual improvement of the innovation management system to ensure that the innovation initiatives and processes are adequately supported, resourced, and managed, and that opportunities and risks are identified and addressed by the organization.
The PDCA cycle can be applied to the innovation management system as a whole or its parts. Figure 1 illustrates how Clauses 4 to 10 can be grouped in relation to the PDCA cycle. The cycle is informed and directed by the context of the organization (Clause 4) and its leadership (Clause 5).

Figure 1 — Representation of the framework of the innovation management system with references to the clauses of this document

 
 
 
The cycle can be briefly described as follows:
  • a) Plan: Establish the objectives and determine the actions needed to address opportunities and risks (Clause 6);
  • b) Do: Implement what is planned in terms of support and operations (Clauses 7 and 8);
  • c) Check: Monitor and (where applicable) measure results against objectives (Clause 9);
  • d) Act: Take actions to continually improve the performance of the innovation management system (Clause 10).
0.3.3   Managing uncertainty and risk
Innovation activities need to address high degrees of variation and uncertainty, particularly during the early creative phases. They are explorative and characterized by search, experimentation, and learning. As the process progresses, knowledge is gained and uncertainty is reduced.
Innovation initiatives involve risk-taking and not all of these will result in innovation. Discontinued initiatives are an integral part of the processes and sources of learning as input to future innovation initiatives.
The acceptable degree of risk is dependent on the innovation ambition, the organization’s capabilities and the types of innovations addressed by the organization. Managing risk can be addressed by different approaches, e.g. iterative learning, partnering, or portfolio diversification with different risk levels. A systems approach is critical for understanding interdependencies and managing uncertainties.
Innovation initiatives can be implemented by processes that identify opportunities, create and validate concepts, and develop and deploy solutions. These innovation processes are implemented iteratively and often in a non-linear sequence. They need to be flexible and adaptable to the types of innovations the organization seeks to achieve.
Organizations can establish unified or separate structures, to implement innovation activities. These may require different leadership styles, competencies, and cultures. Implementing an innovation management system can encourage the organization to challenge the status quo and established organizational assumptions and structures. This can help the organization to manage uncertainties and risks more effectively.
0.4   Relationship with other management system standards
This document applies the framework developed by ISO to improve alignment among its International Standards for management systems (see ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1, Consolidated ISO Supplement, Annex SL). This framework enables an organization to align or integrate its innovation management system with the guidance or requirements of other management system standards.
This document relates to the ISO 56000 family of standards, developed by ISO/TC 279, as follows:
  • a) ISO 560001 Innovation management — Fundamentals and vocabulary provides essential background for the proper understanding and implementation of this document;
  • b) ISO TR 56004 Innovation management assessment — Guidance provides guidance for organizations to plan, implement and follow-up on an innovation management assessment;
  • c) ISO 56003 Innovation management — Tools and methods for innovation partnership — Guidance;
  • d) and subsequent standards provide guidance on tools and methods to support the implementation of the innovation management system.
The implementation of an effective and efficient innovation management system can have impact on, or be impacted by, other management systems and can require integration at several levels.
Management system standards complement each other but can also be used independently. This document can be implemented together with other management system standards, helping organizations to balance the exploitation of existing offerings and operations, with the exploration and introduction of new offerings. Organizations can find a balance between innovation management guidance and other management system standards.
Organizations that have not adopted other management system standards can adopt this document as stand-alone guidance within their organization.
 
 
 

1   Scope

This document provides guidance for the establishment, implementation, maintenance, and continual improvement of an innovation management system for use in all established organizations. It is applicable to:
  • a) organizations seeking sustained success by developing and demonstrating their ability to effectively manage innovation activities to achieve the intended outcomes;
  • b) users, customers, and other interested parties, seeking confidence in the innovation capabilities of an organization;
  • c) organizations and interested parties seeking to improve communication through a common understanding of what constitutes an innovation management system;
  • d) providers of training in, assessment of, or consultancy for, innovation management and innovation management systems;
  • e) policy makers, aiming for higher effectiveness of support programs targeting the innovation capabilities and competitiveness of organizations and the development of society.
 
 
 
All the guidance within this document is generic and intended to be applicable to:
  • a) all types of organizations, regardless of type, sector, or size. The focus is on established organizations, with the understanding that both temporary organizations and start-ups can also benefit by applying these guidelines in all or in part;
  • b) all types of innovations, e.g. product, service, process, model, and method, ranging from incremental to radical;
  • c) all types of approaches, e.g. internal and open innovation, user-, market-, technology-, and design-driven innovation activities.
It does not describe detailed activities within the organization, but rather provides guidance at a general level. It does not prescribe any requirements or specific tools or methods for innovation activities.
 
 
 

2   Normative references

The following documents are referred to in the text in such a way that some or all of their content constitutes requirements of this document. For dated references, only the edition cited applies. For undated references, the latest edition of the referenced document (including any amendments) applies.
  • ISO 56000, Innovation management — Fundamentals and vocabulary
 
 
 

3   Terms and definitions

For the purposes of this document, the terms and definitions given in ISO 56000 apply.
ISO and IEC maintain terminological databases for use in standardization at the following addresses:
 
 

Bibliography

[1] BS 7000-1:2008, (Great Britain) Design management systems — Part 1: Guide to managing innovation
[2] CEN/TS 16555 (all parts), Innovation Management System
[3] EN 1325:2014, Value Management  Vocabulary  Terms and definitions
[4] FD X50-271:2013, (France) Management of innovation  Guidelines for implementing an innovation management approach
[5] ISO 704:2009Terminology work — Principles and methods
[6] ISO 9000:2015Quality management systems — Fundamentals and vocabulary
[7] ISO 9001:2015Quality management systems — Requirements
[8] ISO 9004:2018Quality management — Quality of an organization — Guidance to achieve sustained success
[9] ISO 14001:2015Environmental management systems — Requirements with guidance for use
[10] ISO 18091:2014Quality management systems — Guidelines for the application of ISO 9001:2008 in local government
[11] ISO 19600:2014Compliance management systems — Guidelines
[12] ISO 21500Guidance on project management
[13] ISO 22301:2012Societal security — Business continuity management systems — Requirements
[14] ISO 26000:2010Guidance on social responsibility
[15] ISO/IEC 27001:2013Information technology — Security techniques — Information security management systems — Requirements
[16] ISO 31000:2018Risk management — Guidelines
[17] ISO 37500:2014Guidance on outsourcing
[18] ISO 50001:2018Energy management systems — Requirements with guidance for use
[19] ISO 55001:2014Asset management — Management systems — Requirements
[20] ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1, Consolidated ISO Supplement, Annex SL
[21] NP 4456: 2007, (Portugal) Management of research, development, and innovation (RDI) — Terminology and definitions of RDI activities
[22] Manual Oslo, 2018, Guidelines for collecting, reporting and using data on innovation. OECD, Fourth Edition
[23] SWiFT 1:2009, (Ireland) Guidance to good practice in innovation and product development processes
[24] UNE 166000:2014, (Spain) R&D&i management — Terminology and definitions of R&D&i activities
[25] https://committee.iso.org/home/tc176sc2 — Guidance on ISO 9001 and Resources/ Auditing Practices Group
[26] ISO 19011:2018Guidelines for auditing management systems

A) ISO 56000: Innovation Management System – The proper implementation of a management system or mechanism (such as: quality management system) requires knowledge of the conceptual and operational framework of that system and its appropriate planning for each platform, such as an organization. Hence, this document provides the terms, definitions, concepts and principles of innovation management and its systematic implementation.

B) ISO 56001: Innovation Management System – This document provides the executive requirements and audit of the Innovation Management System in each operating platform (such as: organization, company, factory, workshop, startup, etc.).

C) ISO 56002: Innovation Management System – Innovation Management System – This document serves as a guidance document, the generalities of an efficient and effective innovation management system or mechanism. These generalities include the design, deployment, implementation, maintenance and continuous improvement of the innovation management system that can be exploited in any operating platform (such as: organization, company, factory, workshop, startup, etc.).

D) ISO 56003: This document provides a framework, methods and tools for cooperation and innovation participation as a guidance document. In this document, issues such as: measuring the entry into partnership, challenges of cooperation and partnership and interaction between the parties and different types of cooperation and innovation innovation, regardless of the type and size of the organization, are included.

E) ISO 56004: Innovation Management System – This document presents the concepts, benefits and evaluation framework of innovation management. It also describes how to plan and implement an innovation management evaluation, regardless of the type of innovation (such as: product, service, process, etc.).

C) ISO 56005: Innovation Management System – Effective intellectual property management is the key to supporting innovation processes and in any organization on the one hand is the basis for protection and growth and on the other hand is the driving force of competitiveness. This document serves as a guide to the framework, methods and tools of intellectual property management (strategic and operational) in innovation management.

G) ISO 56006: Innovation Management System – Innovation in the organization is the product of innovative and critical thinking to internal and external conditions. This thinking has a strategic and operational approach that requires appropriate and appropriate intelligence within the innovation management system of any organization. Therefore, this document deals with the framework, tools and methods of managing the strategic intelligence of the organization in innovation management.

H) ISO 56007: Innovation Management System – Idea management is the process of creating ideas and achieving them in an effective and efficient way. Obviously, there are several steps in this process that appropriate methods and tools can help the organization to face fewer challenges. This document provides the framework, methods and tools for idea management in the innovation management system.

G) ISO 56008: Innovation Management System – It is said that “what cannot be measured can not be managed! Therefore, an organization that seeks to create value for its stakeholders through innovation needs integrated innovation management and continuous evaluation and measurement of its innovation management system. This document provides methods and tools for measuring innovation performance and operations.

The ISO 56000 document of the family of this standard introduces and explains all the terms, rules and principles of the documents of this standard family and to the organizations, companies, consultants, instructors and all those who use these documents in some way. Provides the proper use of these documents.

Family Standard ISO 56000 – Innovation Management System
NStandard numberStandard description
1
 ISO 56000

Principles and terms of innovation management system

Innovation Management System – The proper implementation of a management system or mechanism (such as: quality management system) requires knowledge of the conceptual and operational framework of that system and its appropriate planning for each context, such as an organization. Hence, this document provides the terms, definitions, concepts and principles of innovation management and its systematic implementation.
2
 ISO 56001

Implementation requirements and audit of the innovation management system

Innovation Management System – This document provides the executive and audit requirements of the Innovation Management System in any operating platform (such as: organization, company, factory, workshop, startup, etc.).
3
 ISO 56002

Generalities of Innovation Management System

Innovation Management System – Innovation Management System – This document serves as a guide document, the generalities of an efficient and effective innovation management system or mechanism. These generalities include the design, deployment, implementation, maintenance and continuous improvement of the innovation management system that can be exploited in any operating platform (such as: organization, company, factory, workshop, startup, etc.).
4
 ISO 56003

Tools and methods of cooperation in innovation

This document provides a framework, methods and tools for cooperation and innovation innovation. In this document, issues such as: measuring the entry into partnership, challenges of cooperation and partnership and interaction between the parties and different types of cooperation and innovation innovation, regardless of the type and size of the organization, are included.
5
 ISO 56004

Innovation Management System Evaluation Guide

Innovation Management System – This document presents the concepts, benefits and evaluation framework of Innovation Management. It also describes how to plan and implement an innovation management evaluation, regardless of the type of innovation (such as: product, service, process, etc.).
6
 ISO 56005

Intellectual property management tools and methods

Innovation Management System – Effective intellectual property management is the key to supporting innovation processes and in any organization on the one hand is the basis for protection and growth and on the other hand is the driving force of competitiveness. This document serves as a guide to the framework, methods and tools of intellectual property management (strategic and operational) in innovation management.
7
 ISO 56006

Strategic intelligence management tools and methods

Innovation Management System – Innovation in the organization is the product of innovative thinking and critical of internal and external conditions. This thinking has a strategic and operational approach that requires appropriate and appropriate intelligence within the innovation management system of any organization. Therefore, this document deals with the framework, tools and methods of managing the strategic intelligence of the organization in innovation management.
8
 ISO 56007

Idea management tools and methods

Innovation Management System – Idea management is the process of creating ideas and achieving them in an effective and efficient way. Obviously, there are several steps in this process that appropriate methods and tools can help the organization to face fewer challenges. This document provides the framework, methods and tools for idea management in the innovation management system.
9
 ISO 56008

Tools and methods for measuring innovation operations

Innovation Management System – It is said that “what cannot be measured can not be managed! Therefore, an organization that seeks to create value for its stakeholders through innovation needs integrated innovation management and continuous evaluation and measurement of its innovation management system. This document provides methods and tools for measuring innovation performance and operations.