ISO 56000:2020 Innovation management — Fundamentals and vocabulary

Every organization or company should conduct a proper needs assessment to select and establish an efficient and effective management system and seek to establish and maintain it by setting goals and formulating executive goals and then by continuously evaluating and improving it. There are different management systems in different fields such as innovation management and quality management, each of which has rules, principles and terms related to that field. Therefore, for proper and purposeful implementation, it is necessary to study and use the basic rules and principles.

The ISO 56000:2020 document introduces and explains all the terms, rules and principles of documents related to the standard family of innovation management system and to the organizations, companies, consultants, teachers and all stakeholders who use them in some way, all that Which is required for the correct operation of the system.

Some of the issues mentioned in this document are as follows:

  • Definition of innovation
  • Types of innovation
  • Innovation system
  • Innovation processes
  • Innovation activities
  • Management system
  • Innovation management system
  • Organizational perspective and organizational innovation perspective
  • Management and leadership of the organization
  • Organizational strategy
  • Innovation strategy
  • organizational goals
  • Innovation goals and innovation management system
  • Stakeholders of the organization and stakeholders of the innovation management system
  • Risk and risk management
  • Innovation risks
  • Development and sustainable organizational development
  • Organizational activity environment
  • Evaluation and improvement
  • Invention
  • Intellectual Property
  • Intellectual property management
  • Etc

ABSTRACT 

1.1 This document provides the vocabulary, fundamental concepts and principles of innovation management and its systematic implementation. It is applicable to:

a) organizations implementing an innovation management system or performing innovation management assessments;

b) organizations that need to improve their ability to effectively manage innovation activities;

c) users, customers and other relevant interested parties (e.g. suppliers, partners, funding organizations, investors, universities and public authorities) seeking confidence in the innovation capabilities of an organization;

d) organizations and interested parties seeking to improve communication through a common understanding of the vocabulary used in innovation management;

e) providers of training in, assessment of, or consultancy for, innovation management and innovation management systems;

f) developers of innovation management and related standards.

1.2 This document is intended to be applicable to:

a) all types of organizations, regardless of type, sector, maturity-level or size;

b) all types of innovations, e.g. product, service, process, model and method, ranging from incremental to radical;

c) all types of approaches, e.g. internal and open innovation, user-, market-, technology- and design-driven innovation activities.

This document specifies the terms and definitions applicable to all innovation management and innovation management system standards developed by ISO/TC 279.

 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

  • Status :  Published
    Publication date : 2020-02
  • Edition : 1
    Number of pages : 37

Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies (ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through ISO technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical committee has been established has the right to be represented on that committee. International organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work. ISO collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.
The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular, the different approval criteria needed for the different types of ISO documents should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www.iso.org/directives).
Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of patent rights. ISO shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights. Details of any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the Introduction and/or on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www.iso.org/patents).
Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not constitute an endorsement.
For an explanation of the voluntary nature of standards, the meaning of ISO specific terms and expressions related to conformity assessment, as well as information about ISO’s adherence to the World Trade Organization (WTO) principles in the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) see
www.iso.org/iso/foreword.html.
This document was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 279, Innovation management.
Any feedback or questions on this document should be directed to the user’s national standards body. A complete listing of these bodies can be found at www.iso.org/members.html.
 
 
 

Introduction

0.1 General
An organization’s ability to innovate is recognized as a key factor for sustained growth, economic viability, increased well-being and the development of society.
The innovation capabilities of an organization include the ability to understand and respond to changing conditions of its context, to pursue new opportunities and to leverage the knowledge and creativity of people within the organization in collaboration with external interested parties.
This document is intended to help the user by establishing a coherent, consistent and common framework to:
  • a) understand the main terms, definitions, concepts and principles of innovation management;
  • b) support an organization to establish, implement, maintain and continually improve an innovation management system and other innovation management standards; and
  • c) facilitate communication and create awareness of innovation activities internally and across organizations.
Clause 3 specifies the terms and definitions that are necessary to understand innovation management and an innovation management system.
Clause 4 provides the fundamental concepts and innovation management principles, describing why organizations should engage in innovation activities, the main concepts regarding innovation and the principles that an organization should consider as the basis for the effective management of innovation activities as well as the foundation of the innovation management system.
Annex A presents the concept relationships graphically.
Annex B presents the relationship between the definitions within this document and those provided by other policy-setting organizations.
0.2 Relationships with other innovation management standards
This document relates to the ISO 56000 family of standards, developed by ISO/TC 279, as follows:
  • a) ISO 56002 Innovation management — Innovation management system — Guidance, provides guidance for organizations to establish, implement, maintain and continually improve an innovation management system;
  • b) ISO 56003 Innovation management — Tools and methods for innovation partnership — Guidance, provides guidance for organizations working together to innovate;
  • c) ISO TR 56004 Innovation management assessment — Guidance, provides guidance for organizations to plan, implement and follow-up on an innovation management assessment;
  • d) ISO 560051 and subsequent standards provide further guidance on tools and methods to support the implementation of an innovation management system.
 
 
 

1   Scope

This document provides the vocabulary, fundamental concepts and principles of innovation management and its systematic implementation. It is applicable to:
  • a) organizations implementing an innovation management system or performing innovation management assessments;
  • b) organizations that need to improve their ability to effectively manage innovation activities;
  • c) users, customers and other relevant interested parties (e.g. suppliers, partners, funding organizations, investors, universities and public authorities) seeking confidence in the innovation capabilities of an organization;
  • d) organizations and interested parties seeking to improve communication through a common understanding of the vocabulary used in innovation management;
  • e) providers of training in, assessment of, or consultancy for, innovation management and innovation management systems;
  • f) developers of innovation management and related standards.
 
 
 
This document is intended to be applicable to:
  • a) all types of organizations, regardless of type, sector, maturity-level or size;
  • b) all types of innovations, e.g. product, service, process, model and method, ranging from incremental to radical;
  • c) all types of approaches, e.g. internal and open innovation, user-, market-, technology- and design-driven innovation activities.
This document specifies the terms and definitions applicable to all innovation management and innovation management system standards developed by ISO/TC 279.
 
 
 

2   Normative references

There are no normative references in this document.
 
 
 

3   Terms and definitions

3.1   General terms related to innovation

3.1.1
innovation
new or changed entity (3.2.5), realizing or redistributing value (3.7.6)
Note 1 to entry: Novelty and value are relative to, and determined by, the perception of the organization (3.2.2) and relevant interested parties (3.2.4).
Note 2 to entry: An innovation can be a product, service, process (3.1.5), model, method, etc.
Note 3 to entry: Innovation is an outcome. The word “innovation” sometimes refers to activities or processes resulting in, or aiming for, innovation. When “innovation” is used in this sense, it should always be used with some form of qualifier, e.g. “innovation activities”.
Note 4 to entry: For the purpose of statistical measurement, refer to the Oslo Manual 2018, 4th edition, by OECD/Eurostat. See Annex B.2 for a comparison between the definitions of innovation by ISO and the OECD/Eurostat.
[SOURCE: ISO 9000:2015, 3.6.15, modified by using the term “entity” instead of “object” and by replacing Notes 1 and 2 to entry with the new Notes 1 to 4 to entry.]
 
3.1.1.1
radical innovation
breakthrough innovation
innovation (3.1.1) with a high degree of change
Note 1 to entry: Change can relate to the entity (3.2.5) or its impact.
Note 2 to entry: Radical innovation is at the other end of the continuum to incremental innovation.
 
3.1.1.2
disruptive innovation
innovation (3.1.1) initially addressing less demanding needs, displacing established offerings
Note 1 to entry: Compared to established offerings, disruptive innovations are initially simpler offerings with lower performance (3.7.1) and they are generally more cost effective, requiring fewer resources and offered at lower cost.
Note 2 to entry: Disruption occurs when a significant ratio of users or customers have adopted the innovation.
Note 3 to entry: Disruptive innovations can create new markets and value networks by addressing new users and deploying new business and value realization models.
 
3.1.2
management
coordinated activities to direct and control an organization (3.2.2)
Note 1 to entry: Management can include establishing strategies (3.3.4)policies (3.3.2) and objectives (3.3.3) and processes (3.1.5) to achieve those objectives.
Note 2 to entry: Control can include defining roles, appointing authority, assigning tasks, establishing incentives and rewards, and empowering and engaging people.
Note 3 to entry: The word “management” sometimes refers to people, i.e. a person or group of people with authority and responsibility for the conduct and control of an organization. When “management” is used in this sense, it should always be used with some form of qualifier, e.g. “top management”.
[SOURCE: ISO 9000:2015, 3.3.3, modified by adding “strategies” to Note 1 to entry and by simplifying the text of Note 3 to entry.]
 
3.1.2.1
innovation management
Note 1 to entry: Innovation management can include establishing an innovation vision (3.3.1.1)innovation strategy (3.3.4.1)innovation policy (3.3.2.1) and innovation objectives (3.3.3.1), and organizational structures and innovation processes (3.1.5.1) to achieve those objectives through planning, support, operations, performance (3.7.1)evaluation (3.8.3) and improvement (3.1.7).
 
3.1.3
system
set of interrelated or interacting elements
[SOURCE: ISO 9000:2015, 3.5.1]
 
3.1.3.1
management system
set of interrelated or interacting elements of an organization (3.2.2) to establish strategies (3.3.4)policies (3.3.2) and objectives (3.3.3) and processes (3.1.5) to achieve those objectives
Note 1 to entry: A management system can address a single discipline or several disciplines, e.g. innovation management (3.1.2.1), quality management, financial management, or environmental management.
Note 2 to entry: The management system elements include the organization’s structure, roles and responsibilities, planning, support and operation.
Note 3 to entry: The scope of a management system can include the whole of the organization, specific and identified functions of the organization, specific and identified sections of the organization, or one or more functions across a group of organizations.
Note 4 to entry: This constitutes one of the common terms and core definitions of the high level structure for ISO management system standards. The original definition has been modified by adding “strategies” and by adding examples to Note 1 to entry, by replacing “system” with “management system” and adding “support” to Note 2 to entry.
 
3.1.3.2
innovation system
Note 1 to entry: An innovation system can be related to a country or nation, e.g. a national innovation system, a region, an industry sector, an entire or part of an organization (3.2.2), a cluster or network of organizations, a community of practitioners or any value network or ecosystem of various interested parties (3.2.4).
Note 2 to entry: An innovation system can include an innovation management system (3.1.3.3).
 
3.1.3.3
innovation management system
Note 1 to entry: An innovation management system can be part of a general or integrated management system of an organization (3.2.2).
 
3.1.4
innovation activity
activity with regard to innovation (3.1.1)
Note 1 to entry: Innovation activities can be planned or unplanned.
Note 2 to entry: Innovation activities are directly or indirectly aiming for innovation. Not all innovation activities result in innovation.
 
3.1.5
process
set of interrelated or interacting activities that use inputs to deliver an intended result
Note 1 to entry: This constitutes one of the common terms and core definitions of the high level structure for ISO management system standards. The original definition has been modified to prevent circularity between process and output.
 
3.1.5.1
innovation process
Note 1 to entry: Innovation processes are generally planned and carried out under controlled conditions to realize value (3.7.6).
Note 2 to entry: Innovation processes can be configured to suit innovation initiatives (3.6.1).
Note 3 to entry: Innovation processes are designed to manage uncertainty (3.2.6) with innovation as the intended result. Not all innovation processes result in innovation.
Note 4 to entry: An innovation process consists of several innovationactivities (3.1.4). Examples of innovation processes are identification of opportunities, creation and validation of concepts, and development and deployment (3.6.4) of solutions.
Note 5 to entry: Innovation processes can be implemented within an organization (3.2.2) or across organizations in the case of, e.g. collaborative innovation, innovation clusters, value networks, or ecosystems.
 
3.1.6
invention
Note 1 to entry: An invention should be new in the sense that it has not existed before.
Note 2 to entry: An invention is created and is generally the result of intellectual work.
Note 3 to entry: An invention can be a product, service, process (3.1.5), model, method, etc.
 
3.1.6.1
patentable invention
invention (3.1.6) eligible for patent protection under the applicable law
 
3.1.7
improvement
activity to enhance performance (3.7.1)
Note 1 to entry: The activity can be recurring or singular.
[SOURCE: ISO 9000:2015, 3.3.1]
 
3.1.7.1
continual improvement
recurring activity to enhance performance (3.7.1)
Note 1 to entry: This constitutes one of the common terms and core definitions of the high level structure for ISO management system standards.
 
 
 
 

3.2   Terms related to organization

3.2.1
top management
person or group of people who directs and controls an organization (3.2.2) at the highest level
Note 1 to entry: Top management has the power to delegate authority and provide resources within the organization.
Note 2 to entry: If the scope of the management system (3.1.3.1) covers only part of an organization, then top management refers to those who direct and control that part of the organization.
Note 3 to entry: This constitutes one of the common terms and core definitions of the high level structure for ISO management system standards.
 
3.2.2
organization
person or group of people that has its own functions with responsibilities, authorities and relationships to achieve its objectives (3.3.3)
Note 1 to entry: The concept of organization includes, but is not limited to sole-trader, company, corporation, firm, enterprise, authority, partnership, charity or institution of any size, or part or combination thereof, whether incorporated or not, public, or private, governmental, or non-governmental, national, or international.
Note 2 to entry: This constitutes one of the common terms and core definitions of the high level structure for ISO management system standards. The original definition has been modified by adding more examples to Note 1 to entry.
 
3.2.3
context of the organization
combination of internal and external issues that can have an effect on an organization’s (3.2.2) approach to developing and achieving its objectives (3.3.3)
Note 1 to entry: In English, this concept is often referred to by other terms such as “business environment”, “organizational environment” or “ecosystem of an organization”.
[SOURCE: ISO 9000:2015, 3.2.2, modified by removing the original Notes 1, 2 and 4 to entry.]
 
3.2.4
interested party
person or organization (3.2.2) that can affect, be affected by, or perceive itself to be affected by a decision or activity
Note 1 to entry: This constitutes one of the common terms and core definitions of the high level structure for ISO management system standards.
 
3.2.5
entity
anything perceivable or conceivable
EXAMPLE:
Product, service, process (3.1.5), model (e.g. an organizational, business, operational or value realization model), method (e.g. a marketing or management method) or a combination thereof.
Note 1 to entry: Entities can be material (e.g. an engine), immaterial (e.g. a project plan) or imagined (e.g. the future state of the organization).
[SOURCE: ISO 9000:2015, 3.6.1, modified by replacing “object” with “entity” as the preferred term, by adding and removing examples and by replacing “non-material” by “immaterial” in Note 1 to entry.]
 
3.2.6
uncertainty
state of deficiency of information, understanding, or knowledge (3.4.1)
Note 1 to entry: The deficiency can be full or partial.
Note 2 to entry: Uncertainty can be related to the consequences or likelihood of an event, or the characteristics of an entity (3.2.5).
Note 3 to entry: Uncertainties can be managed by systematically addressing critical assumptions regarding the consequences, likelihood, or characteristics of events and entities, to gain information, understanding and knowledge.
 
3.2.7
risk
Note 1 to entry: An effect is a deviation (3.8.10) from the expected — positive or negative.
Note 2 to entry: Risk is often characterized by reference to potential “events” (as defined in ISO Guide 73:2009, 3.5.1.3) and “consequences” (as defined in ISO Guide 73:2009, 3.6.1.3) or a combination of these.
Note 3 to entry: Risk is often expressed in terms of a combination of the consequences of an event (including changes in circumstances) and the associated “likelihood” (as defined in ISO Guide 73:2009, 3.6.1.1) of occurrence.
Note 4 to entry: This constitutes one of the common terms and core definitions of the high-level structure for ISO management system standards. The definition has been modified by substituting the original Note 2 to entry with a separate definition of uncertainty.
 
3.2.8
outsource (verb)
make an arrangement where an external organization (3.2.2) performs part of an organization’s function or process (3.1.5)
Note 1 to entry: An external organization is outside the scope of the management system (3.1.3.1), although the outsourced function or process is within the scope.
Note 2 to entry: This constitutes one of the common terms and core definitions of the high level structure for ISO management system standards.
 
3.2.9
documented information
information required to be controlled and maintained by an organization (3.2.2) and the medium on which it is contained
Note 1 to entry: Documented information can be in any format and media, and from any source.

Note 2 to entry: Documented information can refer to:

Note 3 to entry: This constitutes one of the common terms and core definitions of the high level structure for ISO management system standards.
 
3.2.10
culture
shared values, beliefs and behaviours of an organization (3.2.2) or community
 
3.2.11
work environment
set of conditions under which work is performed
[SOURCE: ISO 9000:2015, 3.5.5, modified by removing Note 1 to entry.]
 
 
 
 

3.3   Terms related to objective

3.3.1
vision
aspiration of what an organization (3.2.2) would like to become or achieve as expressed by top management (3.2.1)
[SOURCE: ISO 9000:2015, 3.5.10, modified by adding “achieve” to the definition.]
 
3.3.1.1
innovation vision
Note 1 to entry: Generally, the innovation vision is consistent with the overall vision of the organization (3.2.2) and provides a framework for the setting of an innovation strategy (3.3.4.1)innovation policy (3.3.2.1) and innovation objectives (3.3.3.1).
 
3.3.2
policy
intentions and direction of an organization (3.2.2), as formally expressed by its top management (3.2.1)
Note 1 to entry: This constitutes one of the common terms and core definitions of the high level structure for ISO management system standards.
 
3.3.2.1
innovation policy
Note 1 to entry: Generally, the innovation policy is consistent with the overall policy of the organization (3.2.2), can be aligned with the innovation vision (3.3.1.1) and provides a framework for the setting of an innovation strategy (3.3.4.1) and innovation objectives (3.3.3.1).
Note 2 to entry: The innovation management principles can form a basis for the establishment of an innovation policy.
 
3.3.3
objective
result to be achieved
Note 1 to entry: An objective can be strategic, tactical, or operational.
Note 2 to entry: Objectives can relate to different disciplines (such as financial, health and safety, and environmental goals) and can apply at different levels (such as strategic, organization-wide, project, product, initiative and process (3.1.5)).
Note 3 to entry: An objective can be expressed in other ways, e.g. as an intended outcome, a purpose, an operational criterion, as an innovation objective (3.3.3.1), or by the use of other words with similar meaning (e.g. aim, goal, or target).
Note 4 to entry: In the context of innovation management systems (3.1.3.3)innovation objectives (3.3.3.1) are set by the organization (3.2.2) consistent with the innovation strategy (3.3.4.1) and the innovation policy (3.3.2.1), to achieve specific results.
Note 5 to entry: This constitutes one of the common terms and core definitions of the high level structure for ISO management system standards. The original definition has been modified by adding “initiative” to Note 2 to entry and “innovation strategy” to Note 4 to entry.
 
3.3.3.1
innovation objective
Note 1 to entry: Generally, innovation objectives are based on the innovation strategy (3.3.4.1) and the innovation policy (3.3.2.1) of the organization (3.2.2).
Note 2 to entry: Innovation objectives are generally specified for relevant functions, levels, initiatives and processes (3.1.5) in the organization.
 
3.3.4
strategy
plan to achieve objectives (3.3.3)
Note 1 to entry: A strategy generally includes a coordinated set of activities and the allocation of resources necessary to achieve the objectives.
Note 2 to entry: A strategy can be applied at different levels and functions in or across organizations (3.2.2). An overall strategy can be supported by a set of more detailed lower-level and functional strategies.
Note 3 to entry: A strategy is generally planned but can evolve or emerge over time as a result of continual adaptations and adjustments.
[SOURCE: ISO 9000:2015, 3.5.12, modified by removing “long-term or overall” before “objectives” and by adding Notes 1 to 3 to entry.]
 
3.3.4.1
innovation strategy
Note 1 to entry: Generally, the innovation strategy is consistent with the overall strategy and strategic direction of the organization (3.2.2), can be aligned with the innovation vision (3.3.1.1) and innovation policy (3.3.2.1) and provides a framework for the setting of innovation objectives (3.3.3.1).
Note 2 to entry: An innovation strategy generally defines the rationale for engaging in innovation activities (3.1.4) and innovation initiatives (3.6.1) and how those activities are expected to realize value (3.7.6) for the organization and relevant interested parties (3.2.4).
Note 3 to entry: An innovation strategy can include the choices made in terms of what will be done, types of innovations to be focused on, who will be involved in terms of interested parties, what will be required in terms of resources, structures and processes (3.1.5), who will be responsible, when it will be completed, and how results will be monitored (3.8.1)measured (3.8.2)evaluated (3.8.3), protected, communicated and documented etc.
 
 
 
 

3.4   Terms related to knowledge

3.4.1
knowledge
outcome of the assimilation of information through learning
Note 1 to entry: Knowledge can be acquired through research, experience, or education.
Note 2 to entry: Knowledge include information, facts, principles, theories and practices that is related to a field of work or study.
Note 3 to entry: Knowledge can be individual or collective. Collective knowledge is gained from people collaborating and releasing their tacit and subconscious knowledge.
 
3.4.2
competence
ability to apply knowledge (3.4.1) and skills to achieve intended results
Note 1 to entry: This constitutes one of the common terms and core definitions of the high level structure for ISO management system standards.
 
3.4.3
insight
profound and unique knowledge (3.4.1) about an entity (3.2.5)
Note 1 to entry: In the context of innovation activities (3.1.4), insights can reveal opportunities for the realization of value (3.7.6).
Note 2 to entry: Identifying insights is generally part of the innovation processes (3.1.5.1).
 
 
 
 

3.5   Terms related to intellectual property

3.5.1
intellectual asset
intangible creation or knowledge (3.4.1) resource which has value (3.7.6)
 
3.5.2
intellectual property
result of intellectual activities that is eligible for protection by law
Note 1 to entry: Intellectual property can include inventions (3.1.6), scientific discoveries, literary, scientific, or artistic works, symbols, designs, names, and images used in commerce, industrial designs, performances, recordings, broadcasts and other creative and industrial works.
Note 2 to entry: “Protection by law” refers to areas of law considered to be intellectual property rights (3.5.3).
Note 3 to entry: See Annex B.3 for a comparison between the definitions related to intellectual property by ISO and TRIPS/WIPO Convention.
 
3.5.3
intellectual property rights
legal rights associated with intellectual property (3.5.2)
Note 1 to entry: Intellectual property rights include copyright and related rights, trademarks, geographical indications, industrial design rights, patents, layout-designs (topographies) of integrated circuits and protection of undisclosed information.
Note 2 to entry: See Annex B.3 for a comparison between the definitions related to intellectual property by ISO and TRIPS/WIPO Convention.
 
3.5.4
intellectual property management
 
3.5.5
intellectual property strategy
 
3.5.6
intellectual property policy
 
 
 
 

3.6   Terms related to innovation initiative

3.6.1
innovation initiative
set of coordinated activities aiming for innovation (3.1.1)
Note 1 to entry: An innovation initiative can be informal or formally controlled and can take the form of a project, program or any other kind of approach.
Note 2 to entry: An innovation initiative can be implemented by one or more innovation processes (3.1.5.1).
Note 3 to entry: The objectives (3.3.3) and scope of an innovation initiative can change and be updated, as the initiative proceeds. An initiative can be discontinued or put on hold or its output can be transferred to other initiatives, projects, or programs. Not all initiatives result in innovations.
Note 4 to entry: A set of innovation initiatives can form an innovation portfolio (3.6.2).
 
3.6.2
innovation portfolio
set of innovation initiatives (3.6.1) grouped together
Note 1 to entry: Innovation initiatives of the portfolio may not necessarily be interdependent or directly related.
Note 2 to entry: An innovation portfolio is generally used to facilitate the management (3.1.2) of innovation initiatives.
 
3.6.3
ideation
process (3.1.5) of generating, sharing and evolving ideas and concepts
Note 1 to entry: Ideation is generally part of innovation processes (3.1.5.1).
 
3.6.4
deployment
process (3.1.5) to bring entities (3.2.5) or resources into effective (3.7.4) action
Note 1 to entry: Deployment is generally part of the innovation processes (3.1.5.1).
[SOURCE: Oxford English Dictionary, modified]
 
3.6.5
open innovation
process (3.1.5) for the management (3.1.2) of information and knowledge (3.4.1) sharing and flows across the boundaries of the organization (3.2.2) with regard to innovation (3.1.1)
Note 1 to entry: Open innovation can be a collaborative process involving several parties, e.g. in the form of a value network.
Note 2 to entry: Open innovation can be facilitated by the presence of an innovation ecosystem or value network.
 
3.6.6
innovation partnership
collaborative effort by two or more organizations (3.2.2) with the intention to achieve innovation (3.1.1)
Note 1 to entry: An innovation partnership can involve establishing joint innovationobjectives (3.3.3.1)strategies (3.3.4), roles, structures, support and processes (3.1.5), including the contribution and sharing of resources, e.g. finances, knowledge (3.4.1) and people.
Note 2 to entry: The purpose of an innovation partnership can be for all parties to mutually benefit from jointly realizing value (3.7.6) from innovation opportunities.
 
 
 
 

3.7   Terms related to performance

3.7.1
performance
measurable result
Note 1 to entry: Performance can relate either to quantitative or qualitative findings.
Note 2 to entry: Performance can relate to the management (3.1.2) of activities, processes (3.1.5), products and services, systems (3.1.3), or organizations (3.2.2).
Note 3 to entry: This constitutes one of the common terms and core definitions of the high level structure for ISO management system standards. The original definition has been modified by modifying Note 2 to entry.
 
3.7.2
indicator
specific information on a state, condition, or impact
Note 1 to entry: Indicators are generally measurable and can be quantitative or qualitative.
 
3.7.3
efficiency
relationship between the result achieved and the resources used
[SOURCE: ISO 9000:2015, 3.7.10]
 
3.7.4
effectiveness
extent to which planned activities are realized and planned results are achieved
Note 1 to entry: This constitutes one of the common terms and core definitions of the high level structure for ISO management system standards. The original definition has been modified by adding “are” before “achieved”.
 
3.7.5
innovation capability
Note 1 to entry: Innovation capabilities can include proficiency in technologies, strategic intelligence, access to funds, operational functions and processes (3.1.5) contributing to innovation performance (3.7.1), competent and experienced people contributing to innovation objectives (3.3.3.1).
 
3.7.6
value
gains from satisfying needs and expectations, in relation to the resources used
EXAMPLE:
Revenues, savings, productivity, sustainability, satisfaction, empowerment, engagement, experience, trust.
Note 1 to entry: Value is relative to, and determined by the perception of, the organization (3.2.2) and interested parties (3.2.4).
Note 2 to entry: Value can be financial or non-financial.
Note 3 to entry: Value can be created, realized, acquired, redistributed, shared, lost, or destroyed.
Note 4 to entry: The value of an entity (3.2.5) is generally determined in terms of the amount of other entities for which it can be exchanged.
Note 5 to entry: The word “value” sometimes refers to a (numerical) unit of data, e.g. the output from measurement (3.8.2) and “values” sometimes refers to principles or standards of behaviour, e.g. included in the concept of culture (3.2.10). When “value” is used in these senses, it should always be used with some form of qualifier, e.g. “numerical value” or the meaning should be obvious from the context.
 
 
 
 

3.8   Terms related to assessment

3.8.1
monitoring
determining the status of a system (3.1.3), a process (3.1.5), or an activity
Note 1 to entry: To determine the status, there may be a need to check, supervise, or critically observe.
Note 2 to entry: This constitutes one of the common terms and core definitions of the high level structure for ISO management system standards.
 
3.8.2
measurement
process (3.1.5) to determine a value
Note 1 to entry: This constitutes one of the common terms and core definitions of the high level structure for ISO management system standards.
 
3.8.3
evaluation
process (3.1.5) of comparing results of analysis to established criteria
Note 1 to entry: Evaluation can be done to determine, e.g. effectiveness (3.7.4)efficiency (3.7.3)performance (3.7.1)conformity (3.8.8), or value (3.7.6).
 
3.8.4
assessment
 
3.8.4.1
innovation management assessment
Note 1 to entry: Innovation management assessment can be done to determine the innovation capability (3.7.5) or innovation performance (3.7.1) of an organization (3.2.2).
 
3.8.5
requirement
need or expectation that is stated, generally implied or obligatory
Note 1 to entry: “Generally implied” means that it is custom or common practice for the organization (3.2.2) and interested parties (3.2.4) that the need or expectation under consideration is implied.
Note 2 to entry: A specified requirement is one that is stated, for example in documented information (3.2.9).
Note 3 to entry: This constitutes one of the common terms and core definitions of the high level structure for ISO management system standards.
 
3.8.6
audit
systematic, independent, and documented process (3.1.5) for obtaining objective evidence and evaluating (3.8.3) it objectively to determine the extent to which the audit criteria are fulfilled
Note 1 to entry: An audit can be an internal audit (first party) or an external audit (second party or third party), and it can be a combined audit (combining two or more disciplines).
Note 2 to entry: An internal audit is conducted by the organization (3.2.2) itself, or by an external party on its behalf.
Note 3 to entry: “Audit evidence” and “audit criteria” are defined in ISO 19011.
Note 4 to entry: This constitutes one of the common terms and core definitions of the high level structure for ISO management system standards. The original definition has been modified to remove effect of circularity between audit criteria and audit evidence.
 
3.8.7
review
determination of the suitability, adequacy, efficiency (3.7.3), or effectiveness (3.7.4) of an entity (3.2.5) to achieve objectives (3.3.3)
EXAMPLE:
Management review.
[SOURCE: ISO 9000:2015, 3.11.2, modified by adding “efficiency”, replacing “object” with “entity” and removing “established” before “objectives” in the definition and by reducing the number of examples and removing Note 1 to entry.]
 
3.8.8
conformity
fulfilment of a requirement (3.8.5)
Note 1 to entry: This constitutes one of the common terms and core definitions of the high level structure for ISO management system standards.
 
3.8.9
nonconformity
non-fulfilment of a requirement (3.8.5)
Note 1 to entry: This constitutes one of the common terms and core definitions of the high level structure for ISO management system standards.
 
3.8.10
deviation
departure from an intended or expected direction, position, or objective (3.3.3)
 
3.8.11
corrective action
action to eliminate the cause of a deviation (3.8.10) or nonconformity (3.8.9) and to prevent recurrence
Note 1 to entry: This constitutes one of the common terms and core definitions of the high level structure for ISO management system standards. The original definition has been modified by adding “deviation”.
 
 
 

Bibliography

[1]ISO 704:2009, Terminology work — Principles and methods
[2]ISO 9000:2015, Quality management systems — Fundamentals and vocabulary
[3]ISO 9001:2015, Quality management systems — Requirements
[4]ISO 9004:2018, Quality management — Quality of an organization — Guidance to achieve sustained success
[5]ISO 10006:2017, Quality management — Guidelines for quality management in projects
[6]ISO 14001:2015, Environmental management systems — Requirements with guidance for use
[7]ISO 22301:2012, Societal security — Business continuity management systems — Requirements
[8]ISO 26000:2010, Guidance on social responsibility
[9]ISO/IEC 27001:2013, Information technology — Security techniques — Information security management systems — Requirements
[10]ISO 30400:2016, Human resource management — Vocabulary
[11]ISO 30401:2018, Knowledge management systems — Requirements
[12]ISO 31000:2018, Risk management — Guidelines
[13]ISO 37500:2014, Guidance on outsourcing
[14]ISO 50001:2018, Energy management systems — Requirements with guidance for use
[15]ISO 55001:2014, Asset management — Management systems — Requirements
[16]ISO 56002:2019, Innovation management — Innovation management system — Guidance
[17]ISO 56003:2019, Innovation management — Tools and methods for innovation partnership — Guidance
[18]ISO/TR 56004:2019, Innovation Management Assessment — Guidance
[19]ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1, Consolidated ISO Supplement, Annex L
[20]ISO Guide 73, Risk management – Vocabulary
[21]BS 7000-1:2008, (Great Britain) Design management systems — Part 1: Guide to managing innovation
[22]BS 8358:2011, Specification for the provision of services relating to the commercialization of intellectual property rights
[23]CEN/TS 16555, Innovation Management (Parts 1-7)
[24]EN 1325:2014, Value Management — Vocabulary — Terms and definitions
[25]FD X50-271:2013, (France) Management of innovation – Guidelines for implementing an innovation management approach
[26]NP 4456: 2007, (Portugal) Management of research, development, and innovation (RDI) – Terminology and definitions of RDI activities
[27]Oslo Manual, 2018, Guidelines for Collecting, Reporting and Using Innovation Data. OECD/Eurostat, 4th edition
[28]Manual SNA, 2009, System of National Accounts 2008. European Commission, et al.
[29]SWiFT 1:2009, (Ireland) Guidance to good practice in innovation and product development processes
[30]UNE 166000:2014, (Spain) R&D&i management – Terminology and definitions of R&D&i activities
 
 
 

Alphabetical index of terms

assessment   13
audit   13
 
competence   9
conformity   14
context of the organization   5
continual improvement   5
corrective action   14
culture   7
 
deployment   11
deviation    14
disruptive innovation    2
documented information    7
 
effectiveness   12
efficiency   12
entity   5
evaluation   13
 
ideation   11
improvement   4
indicator   12
innovation   1
innovation activity   3
innovation capability   12
innovation initiative   10
innovation management   3
innovation management assessment   13
innovation management system   3
innovation objective   8
innovation partnership   11
innovation policy   7
innovation portfolio   10
innovation process   4
innovation strategy   9
innovation system   3
innovation vision   7
insight   9
intellectual asset   9
intellectual property   9
intellectual property management   10
intellectual property policy   10
intellectual property rights   10
intellectual property strategy   10
interested party   5
invention   4
 
knowledge   9
 
management   2
management system   3
measurement   13
monitoring   13
 
nonconformity   14
 
objective   8
open innovation   11
organization   5
outsource, verb   6
 
patentable invention   4
performance   11
policy   7
process   4
 
radical innovation   2
requirement   13
review   14
risk   6
 
strategy   8
system   3
 
top management   5
 
uncertainty   6
 
value   12
vision   7
 
work environment   7

A) ISO 56000: Innovation Management System – The proper implementation of a management system or mechanism (such as: quality management system) requires knowledge of the conceptual and operational framework of that system and its appropriate planning for each platform, such as an organization. Hence, this document provides the terms, definitions, concepts and principles of innovation management and its systematic implementation.

B) ISO 56001: Innovation Management System – This document provides the executive requirements and audit of the Innovation Management System in each operating platform (such as: organization, company, factory, workshop, startup, etc.).

C) ISO 56002: Innovation Management System – Innovation Management System – This document serves as a guidance document, the generalities of an efficient and effective innovation management system or mechanism. These generalities include the design, deployment, implementation, maintenance and continuous improvement of the innovation management system that can be exploited in any operating platform (such as: organization, company, factory, workshop, startup, etc.).

D) ISO 56003: This document provides a framework, methods and tools for cooperation and innovation participation as a guidance document. In this document, issues such as: measuring the entry into partnership, challenges of cooperation and partnership and interaction between the parties and different types of cooperation and innovation innovation, regardless of the type and size of the organization, are included.

E) ISO 56004: Innovation Management System – This document presents the concepts, benefits and evaluation framework of innovation management. It also describes how to plan and implement an innovation management evaluation, regardless of the type of innovation (such as: product, service, process, etc.).

C) ISO 56005: Innovation Management System – Effective intellectual property management is the key to supporting innovation processes and in any organization on the one hand is the basis for protection and growth and on the other hand is the driving force of competitiveness. This document serves as a guide to the framework, methods and tools of intellectual property management (strategic and operational) in innovation management.

G) ISO 56006: Innovation Management System – Innovation in the organization is the product of innovative and critical thinking to internal and external conditions. This thinking has a strategic and operational approach that requires appropriate and appropriate intelligence within the innovation management system of any organization. Therefore, this document deals with the framework, tools and methods of managing the strategic intelligence of the organization in innovation management.

H) ISO 56007: Innovation Management System – Idea management is the process of creating ideas and achieving them in an effective and efficient way. Obviously, there are several steps in this process that appropriate methods and tools can help the organization to face fewer challenges. This document provides the framework, methods and tools for idea management in the innovation management system.

G) ISO 56008: Innovation Management System – It is said that “what cannot be measured can not be managed! Therefore, an organization that seeks to create value for its stakeholders through innovation needs integrated innovation management and continuous evaluation and measurement of its innovation management system. This document provides methods and tools for measuring innovation performance and operations.

The ISO 56000 document of the family of this standard introduces and explains all the terms, rules and principles of the documents of this standard family and to the organizations, companies, consultants, instructors and all those who use these documents in some way. Provides the proper use of these documents.

Family Standard ISO 56000 – Innovation Management System
NStandard numberStandard description
1
 ISO 56000

Principles and terms of innovation management system

Innovation Management System – The proper implementation of a management system or mechanism (such as: quality management system) requires knowledge of the conceptual and operational framework of that system and its appropriate planning for each context, such as an organization. Hence, this document provides the terms, definitions, concepts and principles of innovation management and its systematic implementation.
2
 ISO 56001

Implementation requirements and audit of the innovation management system

Innovation Management System – This document provides the executive and audit requirements of the Innovation Management System in any operating platform (such as: organization, company, factory, workshop, startup, etc.).
3
 ISO 56002

Generalities of Innovation Management System

Innovation Management System – Innovation Management System – This document serves as a guide document, the generalities of an efficient and effective innovation management system or mechanism. These generalities include the design, deployment, implementation, maintenance and continuous improvement of the innovation management system that can be exploited in any operating platform (such as: organization, company, factory, workshop, startup, etc.).
4
 ISO 56003

Tools and methods of cooperation in innovation

This document provides a framework, methods and tools for cooperation and innovation innovation. In this document, issues such as: measuring the entry into partnership, challenges of cooperation and partnership and interaction between the parties and different types of cooperation and innovation innovation, regardless of the type and size of the organization, are included.
5
 ISO 56004

Innovation Management System Evaluation Guide

Innovation Management System – This document presents the concepts, benefits and evaluation framework of Innovation Management. It also describes how to plan and implement an innovation management evaluation, regardless of the type of innovation (such as: product, service, process, etc.).
6
 ISO 56005

Intellectual property management tools and methods

Innovation Management System – Effective intellectual property management is the key to supporting innovation processes and in any organization on the one hand is the basis for protection and growth and on the other hand is the driving force of competitiveness. This document serves as a guide to the framework, methods and tools of intellectual property management (strategic and operational) in innovation management.
7
 ISO 56006

Strategic intelligence management tools and methods

Innovation Management System – Innovation in the organization is the product of innovative thinking and critical of internal and external conditions. This thinking has a strategic and operational approach that requires appropriate and appropriate intelligence within the innovation management system of any organization. Therefore, this document deals with the framework, tools and methods of managing the strategic intelligence of the organization in innovation management.
8
 ISO 56007

Idea management tools and methods

Innovation Management System – Idea management is the process of creating ideas and achieving them in an effective and efficient way. Obviously, there are several steps in this process that appropriate methods and tools can help the organization to face fewer challenges. This document provides the framework, methods and tools for idea management in the innovation management system.
9
 ISO 56008

Tools and methods for measuring innovation operations

Innovation Management System – It is said that “what cannot be measured can not be managed! Therefore, an organization that seeks to create value for its stakeholders through innovation needs integrated innovation management and continuous evaluation and measurement of its innovation management system. This document provides methods and tools for measuring innovation performance and operations.